CD Laboratory for Functional and Polymer Based Inkjet Inks

The Christian Doppler Laboratory (CDL) for Functional and Polymer Based Inkjet Inks started in January 2012 and targets at novel concepts for UV-curable inkjet inks, with a strong focus on non-irritant and eco-friendly materials.

Together with the industrial partners  Schmid Rhyner AG ,  Lithoz GmbH and Wollsdorf Leder Schmidt & Co Ges.m.b.H. new inkjet inks for advanced applications in the fields of optics and bio-medicine are investigated. This research project is subdivided into two strongly interconnected topics dealing with novel UV-curable, non-irritant and bio-compatible inkjet inks and the fabrication of functional materials using multilayer 2D and 3D inkjet printing.

Research

The current research of the Christian Doppler Laboratory focuses on the development and investigation of novel UV-curable, functional inkjet ink concepts with a strong focus on non-irritant and eco-friendly materials. These inks are expected to be food-proof and thus can be used for the printing onto food packaging materials and labels, and also for inkjet printing on textiles and garments. Furthermore, with these new inkjet inks advanced applications in the fields of optics and bio-medicine are realized.

The research work is divided into three interconnected research topics:

Research Topic 1

Research Topic 1

focuses on the chemistry of functional UV-curable inkjet inks, which are non-irritant and provide eco- and bio-compatibility. To achieve this goal, alternative radical based curing reactions are explored on a fundamental level to substitute (meth)acrylate monomers/oligomers in conventional ink formulations.

Research Topic 2

Research Topic 2

deals with the development and investigation of highly efficient photoinitiators providing low migration in the post-cured materials. For that purpose novel copolymerizable and biocompatible photoinitiators are investigated.

Research Topic 3

Research Topic 3

deals with the fabrication of biocompatible 3D structures for the realization of medical implants (e.g. scaffolds and vascular grafts) by means of multilayer 2D and 3D inkjet printing. Moreover, the fabrication of flexible and even stretchable optical devices using 2D multilayer inkjet printing is investigated within this research topic.